Sunday, December 6, 2009

Angel of Freedom

Vi gik forbi denne statue i Szczecin Polen og jeg fortalt alle, at det var meget vigtigt til Polen men jeg kunne ikke huske hvorfor. Vi tog billeder af det og fortsat på vores tur. Efter vi kom hjem, undersøgte jeg mere om det fordi jeg har set det før og ville at vide dens historie. Og jeg er glad at jeg gjort....

We walked past this statue in Szczecin, Poland and I told Patti, Mads, and Ole and that I knew it was important but could not remember why. So we took our pictures of it and continued on our walking tour. After we came back from our trip, I started to research the statue because I wanted to find out its story. And I am glad that I did....



Dette er "Engel af Frihed" statue som stå i Solidarity Park i Szczecin Polen. Det var afdækkede til polske mennesker i August 2005, som var 25 år siden Solidarity Movement begyndte. Jeg har hørt om Polens Solidarity Movement og Lech Walesa i højskole men jeg indrømmer at jeg ikke gav min opmærksomhed til....fordi det virkede så lang vej fra mig....til nu....

This is the "Angel of Freedom" statue which stands in Solidarity Park in Szczecin, Poland. It was unveiled to the Polish people in August 2005, 25 years after the birth of the Solidarity Movement. I have heard of the Polish Solidarity Movement and of Lech Walesa in high school, but I have to admit that I never really paid much attention to it because it seemed so far away..... until now....

Lech Walesa begyndte den Solidarity Movement der polske medarbejder samarbejdede for at flytte Sovjetunionene kontrol ud fra Polen. Han var en almindelig mand som havde en vision at sit land kunne blive fri fra kommunism....

Lech Walesa started the Solidarity Movement in which the working class of Poland came together in order to attempt to remove the Soviet Union's control from Poland. He was a regular man who had a vision that his country could be free from communism.....

Statuen blev rejst til minde for mennesker som blev dræbt i oprøret af december 1970 imod rusland. Vi så på statues skilt at mange af mennesker som blev dræbt var meget unge.... men de ville at kampe for deres lands frihed. De troede på Walesas drøm.

The statue was raised to honor the people who were killed in the riots of December 1970 against Russia. We saw on the statue's sign that so many of the people who were killed during these riots were very young, but they wanted to fight for their country's freedom. They believed in Walesa's dream.

Jeg er meget heldig at bo i Europa, fordi jeg har masser muligheder at se så tingene jeg lærte i skole og læste i bøger.... og på min blog, kan jeg dele dem med jer.

I am so lucky to live in Europe because I have lots of opportunities to see the things that I learned in school and that I have read in books.... and my blog allows me to share those things with all of you.

7 comments:

Amy said...

I'm telling you I want to go on vacation with you!!!! I'd learn so much...if I go alone I'll be able to tell you the best places to eat but that's about it...hahahaha...have a great day my dear!

Kirstin said...

I love that statue not only for what it means, but the structure itself is just lovely. I haven't made it to Poland yet, but now that I'm literally just a few hours away, I will definitely put it on my list!

Thanks so much for the expat support, btw. I really appreciate all that I can get!
I'll be sure to pop around your blog now too, and enjoy your Danish holiday season!

Pete said...

Nice history lesson.

But you seem to have typed the wrong year, it should have been 1980 rather than 1970.
Solidarity (Polish trade union) was first founded in Gdansk in September 1980 at the Lenin Shipyards, where Lech Wałęsa worked as an electrician.
The year also matches with 1980 if the statue was raised in 25 years later in 2005.
2005 - 25 = 1980

Pete said...

Sorry, my bad.
When you wrote 1970 you were talking about the year when the killing happened, and not the year where Solidarity was founded (1980). I got the it mixed up when I read your entry, sorry.

Mandy said...

I love reading your blog because you always share some interesting things! Thanks for doing that :)!

LadyFi said...

Such a beautiful statue. I remember Walesa fighting for freedom: Poland was in the news a lot back then.

sveske said...

I wholeheartedly agree about how cool it is to live where the history in my school books actually played out. I was awestruck the first time I saw Red Square and the Coliseum in Rome, among others.

But it's also weird to live in the former USSR captial city. There's an ongoing disussion here in Russia about whether or not Russian leaders and schools are giving Stalin a "revisionist history" treatment. Some of the sentiments have been along the lines of "Sure he wasn't a good guy, but he did many things for the country." ::sigh::