Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Skole regeler ... School rules

Texas er i den "bible belt" af Amerika så vi har mange regeler at andre stater ikke har. For eksempel-- I FÅ Texas byer, kan du ikke køber øl og vin. I MANGE Texas byer, kan du ikke køber spiritus. I ALLE Texas byer kan du ikke køber øl, vin, eller spiritus før kl. 12 om søndagen (fordi du bør at være i kirke!!). Og i ALLE Texas byer kan du ikke have øl, vin og spiritus på "skole ejendom". Du kan blive fyret hvis du arbejde i skole og have det der.

Texas is in the "bible belt" of America so we have many rules that other states do not have. For example--In a FEW Texas towns, you cannot buy beer or wine. In MANY Texas towns, you cannot buy hard liquor. In ALL Texas towns, you cannot buy beer, wine or liquor on Sundays before noon (because you ought to be in church!!). And in ALL Texas towns, you cannot have beer, wine or liquor ANYwhere on school propoerty. You could actually be fired if you are a school employee and you do this.

Jeg har syntes meget om vores regler i den "bible belt" som hedder Texas fordi i fredags, kørte min rektor og jeg til Nørre gymnasium på Sjælland for at besøge anden IB skole. Vi snakkede med deres rektor og IB koordinator i 4 timer og lærte så meget om IB i Danmark så for at sige "TAK" til dem, bragte vi 4 flasker af gode vin til dem, som er en normal gave i Danmark. Som vi gav vin til dem, tænkte "I Texas, kunne jeg ALDRIG gør dette!" og siden fredag, har jeg tænkt om "HVORFOR"???? Hvem lavede denne regl? Or er det en god og nødvendig regl? Eller er det en gammel regel at ingen vil skifte?? Hvad synes du?

I have been thinking about our rules in the "bible belt" known as Texas because on Friday last week, I drove to Nørre gymnasium with my principal to visit another IB School. We talked with its principal and IB coordinator for about four hours and learned so much about IB in Denmark so as a way to say THANKS to them, we brought 4 bottles of good wine, which is a very normal thing to give as a gift in Denmark. As we gave the wine to them, I thought "In Texas, I could NEVER do this!!" and ever since then, I have thought "WHY"???? Who made these rules? And are they good and necessary rules?? Or are they just old time rules that no one is willing to change?? What do you think?


Vi havde en musikal hos Herning Gymnasium 2 uge siden.....og solgte øl og vin igennem aftenen. MEGET FORSKELLIG fra hvad vi kunne sælge i min skole i Texas!! Men hvorfor?!

We had a musical at the Herning Gymnasium 2 weeks ago... and sold beer and wine during the evening. VERY DIFFERENT from what I was allowed to sell in my school in Texas!! But why??

16 comments:

Bluefish said...

Maybe people are more religious in the south of America? Maybe because they still live by the rules in the Bible?

I'm not sure but these are my guesses. People should not be too uptight in North America.

Drinking is great!

LadyFi said...

The laws in Denmark are much freer than here in Sweden. You are not allowed to have alcohol at schools here either. I think that this is OK because the law here is that kids have to be 21 (or is it 20) to buy alcohol. Also, I can see the ethical problems of connecting drinking and school age kids, can't you?

I do miss not being able to buy beer and wine in the supermarkets like you can in England.

'Babs' said...

I don't know why. Quit yelling at me, LOL!!!!!

No, seriously, I reckon that in the Northern Parts of Europe, people need to drink to withstand the elements.

Stephanie said...

This is something that's hard for me to figure out what I think. In a way, It's crazy that adults can't have beer or wine in schools in America or that you can't serve it at a school play. However I find it so disturbing to see 14-year-olds drunk outside McDonalds on a Saturday night (which I see all the time in copenhagen and in Lund!)

When I was in school I was always taught that Europeans had such a healthy relationship with alcohol because their parents allow them to drink at home when they're young, but I definitely don't believe this, (considering the four European countries I have spent a considerable amount of time in). 14-year-olds puking their brains out in the bathroom at a 9th grade dance from alcohol sold to them there isn't a healthy relationship. Neither is it in university, where it seems like students can't do anything without alcohol... or at a wedding where no one dances until they're drunk!

I think it's the same story in Denmark with kids and alcohol as in America, it just starts 4 years earlier and people aren't as worried about it.

There needs to be a balance between the Scandinavian dependency on alcohol and the American fear of it. Neither is healthy, in my opinion.

Jennie said...

I know. The reasons are probably many many years of socio-economic problems that drove people to drink, spurring a movement against it, driving the pious to ban liquor altogether. I was amazed the first time I went to a school party here. Drinking alongside my teachers! So cool.

Apropos - my mom lives in Denton, where as you may know already, you can't buy liquor. She has to drive either to Lewisville or east on 380 to get some.

Mads and Kelli said...

I agree Stephanie..balance is the key...as in most things.

I do not know why alcohol is such a taboo thing in the southern US... and although the laws might have been made so long ago based on the biblical beliefs, I do not for a second, believe that legislators are now making decisions based on that idea...

One issue for us in Texas is that kids can drive when they are 16 so you couple that with how much weekend drinking goes on (although the legal age is 18) and you have another problem for another blog...

I know Danish teens drink too much also... however one thing that completely impresses me about EVERY Dane I have met and interacted with in my time here is NO ONE would ever get in a car and drive if they have had more than 1. Every dinner or party we attend, the spouses designate who is the drinker that night , so the other can drive. Otherwise, calling a cab is a very common occurrence. Which amazes me!! (FYI for everyone...the driving age here is 18 and it is so expensive to take the course that many wait until much later so teen drinking and driving is just not an issue.)

Mads and Kelli said...

and Jennie...from Allen we drive to the Colony for liquor.. lol. Just one stop from Lewisville!!

Rachel said...

I enjoy reading your comparisons of Danish and American life... and now to learn of the differences in school is very interesting w/ your highlights.
What musical was it? I assume it was put on by the students.

C and H Romenesko said...

Ahhh, memories of no alcohol purchases on Sundays. When I was in college at the U of Minnesota, we would either stock up on Saturday or drive to Hudson, WI to get our stash for football Sundays. It's actually a state law in MN. In Wisconsin, most places start selling alcohol after 11 on Saturdays, but it depends on the community and it isn't a state law. In Illinois, some grocery stores (Kroger) provide free samples of alcohol as you shop! Imagine the soccer mom coming home sloshed with her half gallon of milk and a loaf of bread. Hmmm, this could be a good PhD topic (I'm always looking for something good!)...likelihood of government regulated alcohol purchases based upon state's/community's socio-economic status, political affiliation, tied to fed transportation funds...hmmm. Thanks for getting my brain gears turning!

Stephanie said...

Yea, maybe no drinking and driving in Denmark, I don't know - but don't get in a car and hit Swedish country roads on a Saturday night!

KCLC said...

Its just ANOTHER reason why Danes are the most happiest people in the world !! :)

Amy said...

The drinking and driving laws are extremely strict here in Norway- everyone has designated drivers here also but it happens some people drink and drive...horrible. The schools here are not allowed to serve alcohol either and it's funny, we have had these parent meetings where all the parents talked about things we could do to keep kids from drinking too early. Signing contracts between us and our kids, contacting each other when the kids say they are going to a party to make sure that there will be chaperones and no under aged drinking and so on- we sit and parents talk very engaged for what seems like forever...and then I hear Sarah telling me about a party last weekend which seems to be a yearly thing because the kids were all laughing about the year before when some girls were trying to pee outside in the grass and couldn't stay balanced when squatting because they were so drunk and after this party last weekend the talk was again about kids so drunk they couldn't remember how they got from one place to another. I feel like telling all the parents what a bunch of bologny it is to sit around and talk about this when no one is really enforcing things..it sends a double message to the kids which I think is wrong.

I think Danes are a lot freer about a lot of things then their Scandinavian brothers- that has been my impression when I see programs from Denmark- like documentaries and such...looks a lot freer there...

Mom said...

Thoughts on alcohol and lots of other things are so different from country to country and state to state in the US. That's what makes life so interesting - we are all different and we have different ideas about what is appropriate for our teenagers. In the Dallas area to have teenagers who drive at 16 and also have the ability to purchase alcohol would be deadly. I may sound like a prude - but teenagers don't always make the best choices on drinking and sometimes it costs them their life. To me that is a high price to pay for "freedom." As parents, we should teach our kids responsible living and as they mature, hopefully they will embrace it. It is our responsibility as adults to provide a safe environment for young people to grow & learn. Alcohol at school activities would not be tolerated in the South, but also in many other states of the US...thank goodness!

SH said...

And then there's the "unwritten" law in Texas/ the US that if you're a teacher, your students and their parents shouldn't see you drinking, smoking, or being a human. Remember that list of "teacher rules" from the 1800s that said a teacher couldn't be married and had to arrive first at school to light the coal stove or some BS like that?

nettielouise said...

All I know is that I'd chaperone a lot more school dances if they gave me free alcoholic beverages to consume. Heck, that sounds like a lot of fun! I'd probably get out there and dance with them all!

Garkbit said...

Moving to Denmark from Colorado I was very struck by the sight of people buying beer in the cafeteria at lunchtime. It occurred to me that if I'd had a lunchtime beer in my previous job in the States it would probably have resulted in me being sent to rehab.

Of course in Britain where I grew up, the concept of the "liquid lunch" is well established.