Thursday, November 20, 2008

Fik kroner? Got kroner?

Danmark har været del af E.U. siden den 1. januar 1973, men der er en ting Danmark har aldrig skiftet siden de blev en E.U. medlem.... de danske penge. Af de 27 EU medlem lande, bruger 12 deres egen penge i stedet for euroen, inklusiv Danmark. (Se kort her) Dog, mange mennesker i Danmark ville at veksler vores penge fra kronen til euro.

Denmark has been a part of the E.U. since January 1, 1973, but there is one thing that Denmark has not changed since it became a E.U. member.....the Danish money. Of the 27 EU member nations, 12 use their own money instead of the euro, including Denmark. (See map here) However, many people in Denmark want to switch our money from the kroner to the euro.
Mange aviser skriver om "Euro vs. Kroner" debat hver dag. Hvorfor er det en godt ide´og hvorfor er det en dårlig ide´. Alle har en mening, inklusiv Anders Fogh Rasmussen, vores Præmiere Minister. Han er sikker på at Danmark har brug for at veksler til euroen i den nær fremtid, og han er klar til at holde et valg så danskerne kan bestemme sig. Hvad skal de vælge? I 2000, vælgte 53.1% "NEJ" til euro, men hvad skal de sige nu?
Many newspapers are writing about the "Euro vs. Kroner" debat each day. Why it is a good idea and why it is a bad idea. Everyone has an opinion, including Anders Fogh Rasmussen, our Prime Minister. (see story) He is certain that Denmark needs to switch to the euro i the near future, and he is ready to have an election so that Danes can decide for themselves.
What will they choose? In 2o00, 53.1% voted "NO" to the euro, but what will they say now?
Jeg har en stor interesset at finde ud hvorfor nogen siger vi HAR BRUG FOR euro, og nogen siger vi SKAL IKKE HAVE euro. Begge sider har stærke meninger og gode grunde for at støtte deres meninger. I min "undersøge", har jeg fundet en mening som jeg rigtigt godt kan lide. Denne uge spurgte jeg kvinden som jeg underviser -kroner eller euro? Og uden tøven, sagde hun "KRONER, selvfølgelig!" Så jeg spurgte hvorfor, og selv om hendes svar kun havde fire ord, var de stærke! "FORDI DE ER DANSK." Nok om det...
I have quite an interest to find out some people say we NEED the euro, and some say we SHOULD NOT HAVE the euro. Both sides have strong opinions and good reasons to support their opinions. In my "research" I have found one opinion which I really like. This week, I asked a woman that I teach--kroner or euro? And without hesitation, she said "KRONER, of course!" So I asked why and although her answer only had four words, it was powerful. "BECAUSE IT IS DANISH." Enough said....

12 comments:

Bluefish said...

I never liked Euro...every country should has its own currency. Euro is expensive and is inconvenient for travelers who visit Denmark often. I'm all for saving one country's identity. Say no to Euro! Nej nej nej!

LadyFi said...

We don't have the Euro in England or Sweden either... but perhaps we should -as it is far less susceptible to the swings of the stock market in the US, for example. In the latest financial crisis, the euro has remained much stronger than the pound and the Swedish kronor. After all, it takes much more than mere currency to define a country, don't you think?

NotQuiteDanish said...

I also heard that we are better off because we don't have the Euro in this financial crisis. Not having a financial brain cell in my body, I'm not sure if this is true. Do you know?

Paula said...

Im for the Euro. Saying yes to kroner 'because its Danish' doesnt count for a good enough reason to me.

the writer said...

I choose the kroner too! Although it would be thousand times easier to go with the euro (never have to drop by at Forex by the central station again to exchange money) but kroner what makes DK special

Mads and Kelli said...

Paula--I understand what you mean. I just think it is so cool that they have this much pride in "what is danish"..it has a really strong meaning here, like nothing I have ever seen before.

NQD--from living with a banker, I can tell you that right now, moving to the euro, DK would be doing more to help the EU as a whole, instead of the other way around... however, if we ever get to a point in the future where DK is perhaps a bit vulnerable since we are so small, the strength of the EU would help us...but that is a futuristic topic. Right now, we are definitely strong enough to stand on our own.

Stephanie said...

Well, seeing as the Danish Kroner is locked to the Euro, I don't really care if it changes for that reason. What I DO hate is having to live with two currencies all the time! My husband works in Denmark and we live in Sweden, so that's two currencies a day - one for pay one for spending. Yes, things are a little cheaper in Sweden right now because the Swedish Kroner is low, but not when we got here, and that inconvenience isn't worth the hassle! Denmark AND Sweden should go to the euro!

May said...

I have to admit that for my business and my customers it would be a huge advantage to operate only in Euros.

On a personal level, however, I want to keep the krone, and it's mostly a emotional thing. The krone is Danish, it's pretty, and everytime I take a coin or a note out of my wallet, I see something of Denmark's history in it. Plus it's nickel-free and especially designed to be user-friendly for the blind. I just love it.

Jacki said...

Living with a Dane, I know he would never switch to the Euro. It really is a sense of national pride.

Tara said...

Sorry I vote for Euro, but if I would have grown up here I'd say kroner. I do think the 25 ore, which they no longer use :(, is the cutest thing! Good thing I've been saving them since I can't seem to use them :)

Circus Peanuts! I LOVE THEM. But I can only eat one every few days. :) Just one of those odd things!

Indra said...

I only care how much dollar I get for my krona/euro when going back home. Right now the dollar is doing a bit better (likely due to inflation) so it's not so good for my personal bottom line. I think that EU members switch to the Euro would certainly make it simpler but nationalism still has quite a fight against EU solidarity so we'll see how long it takes to sort that one out. Personally, I'm a bit tired of the DK nationalism and attachment to the queen's face on their 20 kr. coins. The American in me can't cope with the royals. I think they're a waste of good tax dollars. And I don't wanna hear crap about them being good ambassadors to the world- that's what elections are for.

Mikkel Birkegaard said...

This is going to be a bit of a rant, my apologies, but it really bothers me that people's reasons for not wanting to switch to the Euro are purely emotional. And the emotional reasons aren't even any good.

I'm a purebred Dane. I've grown up in Denmark and I'm all for the Euro (and EU in general). "Because it's Danish" doesn't convince me one bit. If anything it only makes me want the Euro even more. I think having it would serve as a well-needed reminder that we're all in this big mess of a world together.

If someone's only reason for keeping the Krone is because of national pride, then it seems to me that their sense of nationality must be incredibly weak. My idea of what it means to be Danish (which is, I admit, not always completely clear) has absolutely nothing to do with us having the Krone. Cash is just cold metal and printed paper, and fever and fever Danes use cash anyway. It's been months since I last held cash in my hand. And whether my bank statement says DKR or EUR means nothing to me. Being Danish and European is not antithetical.

For both practical and ideological reasons I'll be looking forward to the day where we switch to the Euro (and get rid of the other three exemptions as well).

@NotQuiteDanish: Having the Euro is much more convenient for businesses and individuals alike, and we would indeed be better of with the Euro in times of financial crisis. Firstly, Denmark would get a say in the financial policies of the EU, which we are subject to whether we have it or not. Secondly, to keep the Krone stable against the Euro the Nationalbank had to hike interest rates compared to that of the European Central Bank. Take a look at these, if the language isn't too much of a barrier:

http://borsen.dk/okonomi/nyhed/144823/newsfeeds_rss/
http://borsen.dk/okonomi/nyhed/142295/newsfeeds_newsdk/

However, now is, as Kelli said, definitely the time.

@Indra: Each Euro-nation has it's own version of the coins (the notes are the same), so even when Denmark makes the switch you won't be able to get away from the queens face.